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A start-up has recruited hundreds of dinner party hosts across Europe and South America. It's coming to New York -- will it succeed?

Getting sucked into bland, overpriced touristy restaurants while traveling is a fact of life. Israel-based start-up EatWith is trying to change that by helping travelers ditch tourist traps for dinner parties with verified local hosts.

The service has already been setting up dinners in Argentina, Brazil, United Kingdom, Spain, and several other European countries and is now heading to the United States -- starting with a launch in New York City this weekend. Here’s a sampling of what’s currently being offered:

As reported in Bloomberg BusinessWeek, meal prices on the New York listings were changed to "suggested donations" in order to gauge the service’s appeal to locals and "help keep EatWith hosts off regulators’ radars." According to the city’s laws, meals cannot be served to the public in permit-less private homes.

For all the other countries EatWith is serving, meals average about $25-$50 per guest. For those prices, it might be worth it to do a little more research on authentic cheap eats in advance.

(h/t AllThingsD)

Top image: Dmitry Kalinovsky/Shutterstock.com

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