Shutterstock

A start-up has recruited hundreds of dinner party hosts across Europe and South America. It's coming to New York -- will it succeed?

Getting sucked into bland, overpriced touristy restaurants while traveling is a fact of life. Israel-based start-up EatWith is trying to change that by helping travelers ditch tourist traps for dinner parties with verified local hosts.

The service has already been setting up dinners in Argentina, Brazil, United Kingdom, Spain, and several other European countries and is now heading to the United States -- starting with a launch in New York City this weekend. Here’s a sampling of what’s currently being offered:

As reported in Bloomberg BusinessWeek, meal prices on the New York listings were changed to "suggested donations" in order to gauge the service’s appeal to locals and "help keep EatWith hosts off regulators’ radars." According to the city’s laws, meals cannot be served to the public in permit-less private homes.

For all the other countries EatWith is serving, meals average about $25-$50 per guest. For those prices, it might be worth it to do a little more research on authentic cheap eats in advance.

(h/t AllThingsD)

Top image: Dmitry Kalinovsky/Shutterstock.com

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Office workers using computers
    Equity

    America’s Digitalization Divide

    A new study maps digital-skilled jobs across industries, metro areas, and demographic groups, revealing deep divides.

  2. Design

    Is This Red, White, and Blue Elephant Worth Saving?

    Illinois politicians agree that Chicago’s Thompson Center should be replaced. Architects and preservationists beg to differ, and a new documentary presents their case.

  3. A toxic site in Niagara Falls, New York, seen from above.
    Environment

    The Toxic 'Blank Spots' of Niagara Falls

    The region’s “chemical genies” of the early 20th century were heralded as reaching into the future to create a more abundant life for all. Instead, they deprived future generations of their health and well-being.

  4. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  5. Navigator

    The Gentrification of City-Based Sitcoms

    How the future ‘Living Single’ reboot can reclaim the urban narrative ‘Friends’ ran off with.