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A Singapore nightclub developed a high-tech method of preventing drunk driving, and apparently it works.

A popular nightclub in Singapore has found a high-tech way to tackle drunk-driving: urine-analyzing urinals.

In partnership with marketing firm DDB, the club Zouk has installed gadgets inside its urinals that warns you if you’re too drunk to drive. The process begins by trading keys in for an RFID (Radio Frequency Identification Device) tag at the club’s valet. Urinals equipped with an RFID reader and a "pee analyzer" device can then detect your tag and determine how much alcohol you’ve consumed. A warning will pop up if your alcohol level is above the legal limit, followed by recommendations for safer options: call a cab or take up the club’s drive-home service. If the warning goes unheeded, another RFID reader at the valet counter identifies those who've been tagged as too drunk and warns a second time.  

This video demonstrates how it all works:

During a two-week test trial, 342 out of 573 guests detected to be too drunk to drive opted for the drive-home service or a cab. While a nationwide rollout is reportedly in the works, whether it’s practical enough to catch on outside authoritarian-leaning Singapore is still in question. But first: what about the ladies?

(h/t PSFK)

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