Locals who watched the Tuesday morning demolition of a oil-burning plant mourned the loss of its fetching, candy-cane-striped smokestacks.

Though it's hard to see among the rapid-fire bang-bang-booms, there are 90 separate explosions going on in this Tuesday morning demolition of a Fort Lauderdale power plant.

The all-out explosive assault on the Port Everglades Florida Power & Light station removes a 1960s-era oil-burning plant to make way for a planned 2016 gas facility that will puff out 90 percent less air pollution. While that's good news for anything with lungs, some locals expressed a wistful regret in seeing the building brought low, what with the way its 350-foot candy-cane stacks livened up the coastal skyline.

Here are a couple reactions from people who gathered at 6:15 a.m. to watch the demolition, as reported by the Sun-Sentinel:

“I watched the stacks give up the ghost this morning, with tears in my eyes,” said Caroline King Groshart, who has lived in nearby Harbor Beach since 1953. “I was 13 when I watched the stacks being built; it was awesome! It won't seems the same driving over the 17th Street Causeway or walking the beach to the jetties or flying into and out of the airport – and not seeing the stacks. Pity they couldn't have just been left there as a landmark.”

Tim Ryan, a county commissioner, also was overwhelmed with nostalgia:

“This morning, we said goodbye to some old friends,” he said. “Those red-and-white-striped smokestacks were really a defining feature of the skyline of Fort Lauderdale. For boaters coming in off the Gulf Stream, those smokestacks were really a beacon for finding your way home.”

These feelings are understandable when you compare the visual impact of both structures. Here's the FPL facility that went bye-bye today:

(Google Maps)

And this is the planned generation station, a squat, grayish entity kind of reminiscent of that joyless terrafroming colony in Aliens:

(FPL)

Not quite as pretty, although much better for the environment. Fare-thee-well, old-timey oil plant, you went down in a blaze of glory (and concrete dust and vaporized mosquitoes):

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Smoke from the fires hangs over Brazil.
    Environment

    Why the Amazon Is on Fire

    The rash of wildfires now consuming the Amazon rainforest can be blamed on a host of human factors, from climate change to deforestation to Brazilian politics.

  2. An aerial photo of downtown Miami.
    Life

    The Fastest-Growing U.S. Cities Aren’t What You Think

    Looking at the population and job growth of large cities proper, rather than their metro areas, uncovers some surprises.

  3. a map of London Uber driver James Farrar's trip data.
    Transportation

    For Ride-Hailing Drivers, Data Is Power

    Uber drivers in Europe and the U.S. are fighting for access to their personal data. Whoever wins the lawsuit could get to reframe the terms of the gig economy.

  4. Transportation

    When a Transit Agency Becomes a Suburban Developer

    The largest transit agency in the U.S. is building a mixed-use development next to a commuter rail station north of Manhattan.

  5. Maps

    The Children’s Book Map That Led Me Out of Depression

    As a child, I loved the fantastical lands from The Phantom Tollbooth. As a troubled college student, I used them as a roadmap to self-acceptance.

×