Locals who watched the Tuesday morning demolition of a oil-burning plant mourned the loss of its fetching, candy-cane-striped smokestacks.

Though it's hard to see among the rapid-fire bang-bang-booms, there are 90 separate explosions going on in this Tuesday morning demolition of a Fort Lauderdale power plant.

The all-out explosive assault on the Port Everglades Florida Power & Light station removes a 1960s-era oil-burning plant to make way for a planned 2016 gas facility that will puff out 90 percent less air pollution. While that's good news for anything with lungs, some locals expressed a wistful regret in seeing the building brought low, what with the way its 350-foot candy-cane stacks livened up the coastal skyline.

Here are a couple reactions from people who gathered at 6:15 a.m. to watch the demolition, as reported by the Sun-Sentinel:

“I watched the stacks give up the ghost this morning, with tears in my eyes,” said Caroline King Groshart, who has lived in nearby Harbor Beach since 1953. “I was 13 when I watched the stacks being built; it was awesome! It won't seems the same driving over the 17th Street Causeway or walking the beach to the jetties or flying into and out of the airport – and not seeing the stacks. Pity they couldn't have just been left there as a landmark.”

Tim Ryan, a county commissioner, also was overwhelmed with nostalgia:

“This morning, we said goodbye to some old friends,” he said. “Those red-and-white-striped smokestacks were really a defining feature of the skyline of Fort Lauderdale. For boaters coming in off the Gulf Stream, those smokestacks were really a beacon for finding your way home.”

These feelings are understandable when you compare the visual impact of both structures. Here's the FPL facility that went bye-bye today:

(Google Maps)

And this is the planned generation station, a squat, grayish entity kind of reminiscent of that joyless terrafroming colony in Aliens:

(FPL)

Not quite as pretty, although much better for the environment. Fare-thee-well, old-timey oil plant, you went down in a blaze of glory (and concrete dust and vaporized mosquitoes):

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. An illustration of the Memorial Day flood in Ellicott City, Maryland.
    Environment

    In a Town Shaped by Water, the River Is Winning

    Storms supercharged by climate change pose a dire threat to river towns. After two catastrophic floods, tiny Ellicott City faces a critical decision: Rebuild, or retreat?

  2. A photo of police officers sealing off trash bins prior to the Tokyo Marathon in Tokyo in 2015.
    Life

    Carefully, Japan Reconsiders the Trash Can

    The near-absence of public garbage bins in cities like Tokyo is both a security measure and a reflection of a cultural aversion to littering.

  3. A line of stores in Westport, Connecticut
    Equity

    Separated by Design: How Some of America’s Richest Towns Fight Affordable Housing

    In southwest Connecticut, the gap between rich and poor is wider than anywhere else in the country. Invisible walls created by local zoning boards and the state government block affordable housing and, by extension, the people who need it.

  4. Environment

    A 13,235-Mile Road Trip for 70-Degree Weather Every Day

    This year-long journey across the U.S. keeps you at consistent high temperatures.

  5. Cars sit in a crosswalk.
    Transportation

    What if More People Could Issue Parking Tickets?

    Washington, D.C., considers training a group of residents to give tickets for some parking violations. Would it make streets safer for pedestrians and cyclists?