Serveball

This tennis-sized ball can take cool pictures and help save lives.    

It's here folks -- the world's first "intelligent throwable camera, a ball capable of stabilized, full spherical 360° photography and video capture."

Squito, developed by Boston-based inventor Steve Hollinger, has embedded orientation sensors, position sensors, and high-speed, wide-angle cameras. It has plenty of applications for both work and play. Besides sky-high selfies, the camera balls are sure to produce cool 3D panoramic visualizations of all kinds of environments. Sherlock-Holmes-style mind palaces, anyone?

The Darkball variation, which allows real-time transmission of near-infrared and thermal video in darkness and smoke and fog, can also assist emergency search-and-rescue missions and inform energy considerations in architecture. It's currently in development for manufacturing and licensing.

Watch it in action:

 

(h/t Core77)

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