Where people Tweet in San Francisco, New York City, and Istanbul.

Maps of Twitter offer insight into our collective geographic minds on everything from city metaphors to slurs to language diversity.

Now, here are some new maps showing something much less complex: where we Tweet the most. Culling from a database of "every geotagged tweet ever recorded," Twitter data visualization scientist Nicolas Belmonte created topographical maps of San Francisco, New York City, and Istanbul based on the number of Tweets coming out of places in those cities.

The interactive versions are in 3D and come in different styles, too.

Here is San Francisco in "Watermark."

And New York City in "Clear."

Finally, Istanbul in "Heat."

(h/t Google Maps Mania)

All screenshots taken with permission of Twitter.

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