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It's a celebration of cafecito, Cuban culture, and the city's area code.

One afternoon in April 2012, Miami resident JennyLee Molina was having her usual coffee break when she noticed the time: 3:05 p.m., which is coincidentally also the city’s area code. As ABC News reports, she tweeted a picture of her cafecito - a sweetened espresso originated from Cuba - along with the hashtag "#305cafecito." The hashtag quickly took off as Miami cafecito lovers used it to share their own coffee breaks. "#305cafecito" suddenly transformed into a viral social media campaign to make "3:05" Miami’s official cafecito time.

The outcome? This past April, Miami Mayor Tomás Regalado declared 3:05 p.m. Miami’s official coffee break time, recognizing the power of Cuban coffee culture in bringing together the city's diverse community. This is at once a success for coffee breaks and for honoring a cultural cornerstone of the city.

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