Visualizing the various digital divides in the city.

Last month, we shared how 3D mapping can produce striking visualizations of New York City’s wealth gap. It's also, it turns out, a neat way to visualize a city’s Twitter activity.

Stephan Hügel and Flora Roumpani, two PhD students at University College London’s Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, created TweetCity, a tool that can capture London-based tweets and project them onto the built environment. This video preview shows the result of mapping nearly over 3,500, or 16 hours worth of tweets.  

Although this project is still in an early stage, the pair has bigger plans in store. Hugel told Fast.Co Exist, "Ideally, rather than showing 24 hours of data, you could show a week, or a month, then track the peaks and troughs." Through further development, including the incorporation of other types of geocoded data, TweetCity can begin to dynamically visualize various digital divides in the city.

(h/t Fast.Co Exist)

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