Disturbing concept, or most brilliant marketing ploy ever? 

The car-ordering service Uber likes to offer over-the-top promotions. They've given away free rides for an entire weekend and allowed Uber users to order ice cream trucks like they would a car. Today's offer tops all that. In honor of National Cat Day, which is apparently a thing, and in partnership with icanhascheezburger, Uber is "delivering kittens on-demand" in Seattle, New York, and San Francisco. 

As with all of Uber's promotions, you have to have downloaded the Uber app to get things started, after which, if you're in one those three cities, you'll see a "KITTENS!" option. If kittens are available when you request them ("demand for kittens will be very high"), Uber will bring them to you, along with some cupcakes from the, uh, "famous Ace of Cakes." You get 15 minutes with a small cuddly critter that is hopefully not too confused by being shuttled around a huge city; Uber gets $20 and another person with the Uber app on their phone. 

Uber may never be able to win the hearts of the entrenched taxi industry, but they've just about locked down the Internet set: 

While some Twitter users have raised concerns about the kittens' welfare, Uber, ever conscious of its image, seems to have covered that base by partnering with the Seattle Humane Society, the ASPCA of New York, and the San Francisco SPCA. Uber's marketing operation continues to be amazingly slick.

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