Paul Cowan/Google+

Because they would.

It was a bit of a sad day when dismal ridership shut down the Sydney Monorail this past June. But it appears the monorail has found new life in, of all places, Google’s offices.

Early this year, Google Australia employee Paul Cowan submitted a joke request to the company's facilities team, suggesting that Google should buy the decommissioned monorail to help its employees get around. Little did he know it would be taken seriously.

Fast forward to this week and the company has installed two monorail cars in its office (read about the whole process here). Here are pictures to prove this happened.

While the carriages won’t be making any trips around the office, they will be repurposed as meetings rooms. Which is still kind of cool.

But is it $250,000 cool? Because that’s how much it reportedly cost to transport and install the new office hotspot.

(h/t Gizmodo)

Images in the story by Benjamin Hyneck on Google+
Top image: Paul Cowan on Google+ 

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