Paul Cowan/Google+

Because they would.

It was a bit of a sad day when dismal ridership shut down the Sydney Monorail this past June. But it appears the monorail has found new life in, of all places, Google’s offices.

Early this year, Google Australia employee Paul Cowan submitted a joke request to the company's facilities team, suggesting that Google should buy the decommissioned monorail to help its employees get around. Little did he know it would be taken seriously.

Fast forward to this week and the company has installed two monorail cars in its office (read about the whole process here). Here are pictures to prove this happened.

While the carriages won’t be making any trips around the office, they will be repurposed as meetings rooms. Which is still kind of cool.

But is it $250,000 cool? Because that’s how much it reportedly cost to transport and install the new office hotspot.

(h/t Gizmodo)

Images in the story by Benjamin Hyneck on Google+
Top image: Paul Cowan on Google+ 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  2. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  3. Life

    Can Toyota Turn Its Utopian Ideal Into a 'Real City'?

    The automaker-turned-mobility-company announced last week it wants to build a living, breathing urban laboratory from the ground up in Japan.

  4. a photo of a Dodge Challenger
    Transportation

    The ‘Airbnb of Cars’ Gets Heat From the Rental Car Industry

    Peer-to-peer sharing services that let owners rent out their vehicles are a focus of concern from traditional car rental companies, who see disruption ahead.

  5. Equity

    A Visual History of the U.S. Census

    Vulnerable communities are bracing for an undercount in 2020. It’s a familiar story that traces back to the Articles of Confederation.

×