At our best, we are dots.

That seems like a lot of green, right?

But then you zoom in, and the colors are people. There are around 1,278,838,000 Facebook accounts right now, each allotted an equally-sized plot of pixels on the new website "The Faces of Facebook." Natalia Rojas of Barcelona launched it last week. The site has since been intermittently debilitated by heavy traffic.

Mark Zuckerberg, a California man, has pole position in the upper left. The newest person to join is on the lower right. Can you see them? If you zoom, you can see everyone.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION]

You can also sign in through Facebook and find yourself. Or just spend years combing the dots to find yourself. The site updates in real time, so each position is constantly shifting. You can improve your position and get closer to Mark by eliminating the people between you ... if you get what I'm saying.

Or you can click on any square and find a random person. Then maybe add them as a friend and send a message: "Hey, I found you on that site with all of the people on Facebook. How is your day going? Mine is fine."

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION]

Rojas told CNN, "I was playing around with Facebook API, and I discovered that there is a way to access everyone's public information with a very simple (but not obvious) algorithm." She said she was inspired by the idea that Facebook profile pictures are an example of a person's best self.

"There is a mix of people from all over the world," she said, "And somehow we are all telling our friends: 'Look, this is me, when I like myself.'"

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A small accessory dwelling unit—known as an ADU—is attached to an older single-family home in a Portland, Oregon, neighborhood.
    Design

    The Granny Flats Are Coming

    A new book argues that the U.S. is about to see more accessory dwelling units and guides homeowners on how to design and build them.

  2. Environment

    Britain's Next Megaproject: A Coast-to-Coast Forest

    The plan is for 50 million new trees to repopulate one of the least wooded parts of the country—and offer a natural escape from several cities in the north.

  3. 1970s apartment complex in downtown Buffalo
    Equity

    The Last Man Standing in a Doomed Buffalo Housing Complex

    After a long fight between tenants and management, John Schmidt is waiting for U.S. Marshals to drag him out of Shoreline apartments, a Brutalist project designed by Paul Rudolph.

  4. The White House is seen reflected during a rainy day in Washington, D.C.
    POV

    The City That 'This Town' Forgot

    Washington, D.C., is home to a huge concentration of reporters. Why do they miss the stories happening in their own city?

  5. U.S. Embassy in London
    Design

    America's Passive-Aggressive New Embassy Arrives in London

    Why can’t we let bunkers be bunkers?