But flood insurance hikes may make this quiet beach-side neighborhood unaffordable for many residents.

One year ago tomorrow, storm surge from Hurricane Sandy set off a fire in Breezy Point, Queens, that leveled over 100 homes. Now, construction is underway to rebuild the community from the ground up. But in July 2012, Congress decided to slash subsidies for federal flood insurance, and many residents now worry that rising rates could soon make this quiet beach-side neighborhood unaffordable.

 

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