Unlock the bike with a smartphone and grant access to friends. 

We already have official bike-share systems and online marketplaces for renting out bikes. But BitLock, a new keyless lock, creates a charming new way to make any bike a bike-share bike.

How does it work? BitLock uses Bluetooth technology to replace traditional bike keys with the smartphone. Once you’re within 3 feet of the bike, you can unlock it through the mobile application or by pressing the "unlock" button (it re-locks when you’re more than 3 feet away). BitLock works with various iPhone and Android models, and has been tested in rain and snow. The creators also boast a battery life of 5 years, based on an average usage of 5 lock/unlocks a day.

To share bikes with friends, all you need to do is create a profile for the bike and create a profile for each user. You can then grant anyone permission to access the bike, and set geographic zones for its return.

BitLock’s $120,000 Kickstarter campaign just launched today, with estimated product delivery in July 2014. The early-bird price is $79, with a proposed retail price of $140.

All images courtesy of BitLock.

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