"Please be aware that the new Die Hard move is being filmed here today. Be alert for fireballs, floods, and bad acting."

Londoners who get their commuter information from social media will need to be a little bit more vigilant. Thanks to a new app, you could wake up to images of bizarre subway service signs getting shared on Twitter. A smattering of this morning's offerings. 

The signs were made with this "service information sign maker," whipped up by Tim Waters of Yorkshire this weekend. The customized signs caught Londoners by surprise at first. But now, they've quickly embraced the clever tool for both jokes and commentary. 

At least one person, though, has already had enough. 

(h/t BuzzFeed)

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