Google

Google has mapped the floating city's bridges, canals, and narrow alleys. 

Dying for a weekend getaway? Don't fret, Google's got you covered.

Using the company's Trekker technology - which straps a camera system onto a backpack - Google's Street View Team has delivered panoramic views of beautiful Venice, where cars are banned.

Covering an impressive 265 miles on foot and 114 miles by boat, the team captured iconic landmarks like Piazza San Marco and Teatro La Fenice, as well as "hidden gems" like the Devil’s Bridge in Torcello island and the place where typographer Manutius created the Italics font.

Go ahead and start exploring! 


Click on the arrow on the lower right corner of the map to move the Street View marker around Venice. 

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