Inside one German man's obsession with building a booze-delivering UAV.

With their use in foreign assassinations and warrantless surveillance, there are many reasons to be wary of drones. Nobody can criticize them, however, when they're fulfilling the all-important duty of delivering our beer.

OK, maybe there are one or two little things to watch out for with this German guy's booze-hauling UAV. Namely the risk of the drone accidentally dropping the beer – which in proper Teutonic fashion is the size of an oil can – and sending some unfortunate person into a coma. There's also the prohibitive cost, if the description in this non-English-language video can be trusted: "First delieveries [sic] might be in April 2014 but with 120 € for a five litres beer barrel still pretty expensive." For that price of $163, you could buy a Sam Adams Utopias brew and still have change left over for peanuts.

Yet there's something about a drone buzzing through your window with a cold one that makes it almost worth it. The thing seems pretty stable, too, to judge from the man batting it around in the air. That should come in handy when the thirsty orderer of said beer turns out not to have the money, and starts chucking empties at it.

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