Associated Press

Hint: It's not cars.

In a survey released today, Gallup has identified the one thing American millennials are wedded to: their smartphones.

The survey calls this group "Smartphone Reliants." They’re less likely to own most consumer electronics like PCs, tablets and Blu Ray players—and yet 93 percent of them own smartphones. Smartphone Reliants tend to be 34 and younger and middle income—$30,000 to $74,999 per year.

 

They’re less likely to have gone to college than any other group Gallup identified except for the 28 percent of Americans who barely touch technology at all. Only 27 percent of Smartphone Reliants have at least a Bachelor’s degree compared to 54 percent of “Super Tech Adopters” (who are 31 percent of the surveyed population), and 37 percent of “Mature Technophiles (21 percent of the population).

Gallup says that the 19 percent of Americans that rely primarily on smartphones (and to a lesser extent, on notebook computers) are probably doing so because of their lower income and employment levels, compared to other groups.

gallup poll smartphones

If this survey extrapolates to rest of the country, it means that 1 in 5 Americans resemble, both in income profile and technological preferences, the billions of people in emerging markets for whom an affordable smartphone may be their first computing device.

This post originally appeared on Quartz, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  2. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  3. photo: San Diego's Trolley
    Transportation

    Out of Darkness, Light Rail!

    In an era of austere federal funding for urban public transportation, light rail seemed to make sense. Did the little trains of the 1980s pull their own weight?

  4. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  5. Life

    Can Toyota Turn Its Utopian Ideal Into a 'Real City'?

    The automaker-turned-mobility-company announced last week it wants to build a living, breathing urban laboratory from the ground up in Japan.

×