Onewheel

The closest thing we have to a hoverboard.

There’s a new skateboard on the block.

Behold Onewheel, the self-balancing electric board unveiled this week by electric vehicle start-up Future Motion.

Onewheel inventors say the board's powerful sensors and sophisticated algorithms make it easy to learn. Just lean forward or back. Since the Onewheel glides smoothly on pavement, riding it feels more like surfing or snowboarding than like actual skateboarding. It can go up to 12 mph, with an estimated battery life of about 20 minutes per charge.

Here’s the full demo:

Similar attempts have been floating around, but it appears Onewheel is the first you can actually buy. Placing an order through its Kickstarter campaign will cost a hefty $1,299.

"Buy a moped for that kind of money," says fellow Cities writer John Metcalfe -- who’d previously covered another electric board that was also priced at $1,299.

All images courtesy of Onewheel

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