We "drove" thousands of miles to find these beautiful, remote places.

Recently at The Atlantic offices, we decided to take a simulated road trip using Google Street View, stopping only where we could go no further. Our virtual travels took us from the fields of Italy to the fjords of Norway and the tip of South Africa. We had such a great time at the edges of the world, we made a video out of it.

Inspiration for this video came from Alan Taylor’s In Focus photo gallery, “The Ends of the Road.” The Street View “hyperlapse” shots were made possible by the team at Teehan+Lax, who created an open source Street View hyperlapse script. Special thanks goes to Jonas Naimark and Peter Nitsch for this. To create your own hyperlapse, visit the T+L hyperlapse site.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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