A Bay Area icon in your living room. 

The red-and-white 977-foot Sutro Tower is an iconic sight on the California Bay Area skyline. But in the eyes of furniture designer Justin Godar, it also has potential to be a fabulous coat rack.

The Sutro Tower, as seen from Kite Hill, San Francisco (Anirudh Rao/Flickr

Since 2012, Godar's been developing the Sutro Coat Rack, made from precision-cut plywood, with a oil-and-wax finish. Last week, Godar started taking orders online in an extremely successful Kickstarter campaign, where a red-and-white version will cost you a hefty $499.

While the coat rack comes in disassembled, Godar wanted to make the setup process fun and easy. You simply snap all the parts together and then pound in the final piece using a complimentary "beer hammer," shown above. 

He demos the process in this video.

All images via Kickstarter

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