These graphics chart the most popular routes in 22 cities.

Inspired by a 2011 project that mapped popular running routes in a few European cities, Nathan Yau at FlowingData has done the same for 22 major cities, including 18 in the U.S. 

To make these maps, Lau simply grabbed public data from the exercise-tracking app RunKeeper. While these visualizations are not representative of all runners in a city, they do offer useful information on urban spaces. For one, we see that people really do love running near water and in parks.

Here’s a selection of Yau’s work. See the rest here.

Boston

New York City 

Philadelphia

Washington, D.C.

Chicago 

Minneapolis 

Atlanta 

Miami 

Dallas 

Los Angeles 

San Francisco 

Toronto

London 

All images courtesy of FlowingData

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