Experience it like an eerie video game.

Always wishing your city had more trees? A new Google Street View hack called Urban Jungle Street View lets you see how your home would look with too much greenery.

Built by Swedish developer Einar Öberg, Urban Jungle uses the site's depth data to plot all the plants realistically in 3D space. Just like regular Street View, you can pop in an address and drop in the little yellow Pegman to explore a world overrun with plants.

According to The Verge, Google quickly shut down similar map hacks in the past, including one that turned Street View into a first-person shooting game. There’s no telling how long this experiment will stay up, but here’s a few examples of cities look when overgrown with flora.

New York City
Paris 
Stockholm 

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