Grassroots Engineering

Building a boat, Minecraft-style.  

Engineer Jim Smith just finished constructing what he calls the world's first 3D-printed kayak.  

It's assembled from 28 separate pieces of ABS plastic, printed using Smith’s large-scale, home-made 3D printer and joined together with bolts and silicone. It measures about 17-feet long by 2-feet wide and weighs around 65 pounds. At about $500 to make, this kayak sits on the more affordable end of the spectrum as far as kayaks go.

Considering the construction process took more than 1,000 hours over the span of 42 days, it’s not exactly the most efficient use of 3D printing technology. But it does mean you can get a truly unique product -- Smith optimized the shape of the kayak based on his height and weight.

He documents the whole process in this video.  

Top image courtesy of Grassroots Engineering

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