China View/Youtube

Each cost less than $5,000.

Recently in Shanghai, a Chinese company 3D-printed 10 small buildings in about a day.

Walls are made of layers of a concrete aggregate that includes recycled construction waste. Each house, assembled from the printed walls, measures 200 square meters and costs about $4,800.

Granted, these buildings are not the most sexy. You could even argue they're not real 3D-printed buildings since assembly is required. (Rest assured a team from Amsterdam is currently at work on a fully 3D printed canal house). But according to The Architect’s Newspaper, the company hopes the technology will provide an “affordable and dignified" housing option for the impoverished.  

Hear more about the construction process in this video. 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    The Problem With 'Fast-Casual Architecture'

    Washington, D.C., has a huge new waterfront development that’s fun, popular, and easy on the eyes. Is anything wrong with that?

  2. Design

    Experimental City: The Sci-Fi Utopia That Never Was

    With solar energy, recycling, computers, and personal mass transit, the 1960s-era Minnesota Experimental City was a prescient and hopeful vision of the urban future. A new documentary tells its story.

  3. Transportation

    How a Satirical Call for Bikelash Became a Real, Invective-Laden Protest

    People carried signs reading “Nazi Lanes” at the Minneapolis anti-bike lane demonstration, which several political candidates attended.

  4. A man walks his bicycle beside a train in Paris.
    Maps

    Breaking Down the Many Ways Europe's City-Dwellers Get to Work

    One chart shows which cities do best when it comes to biking, walking, or taking public transit to work.

  5. Downtown Los Angeles is pictured.
    Life

    What Everyone Can Learn From L.A.'s Gentrification

    In its second season, WNYC’s podcast “There Goes the Neighborhood” explores the pressures of life in a changing Los Angeles—with lessons for listeners everywhere.