In the Netherlands, it's 500 meters of TRON.

In 2012, Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde and civil engineering firm Heijmans promised to install the first glow-in-the-dark road in the Netherlands by mid-2013. Now, well into 2014, the concept has finally come to life in Oss, a city about 60 miles southeast of Amsterdam.

The photo-luminizing markings, which absorb daylight then release a green glow for up to eight hours in the dark, were recently unveiled on a 500-meter stretch of highway.

This is one of several technologies Roosegaarde and Heijmans envisioned with their "Smart Highway" project, which dreamt of self-sustainable and interactive roads. Other wild ideas (like snowflake symbols that would manifest on the street surface when temperature hits a certain low) did not make it into this pilot stage.

According to the BBC, an official launch for the glow-in-the-dark road is set for later this month. DutchNews.nl reports that Roosegaarde also wants to light up additional roads, but so far hasn't negotiated any more contracts.

Watch Roosegaarde drive along the glowing lines in this video from Dutch public broadcasting network NOS. 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Perspective

    Why Car-Free Streets Will Soon Be the Norm

    In cities like New York, Paris, Rotterdam, and soon San Francisco, car-free streets are emerging amid a growing movement.

  2. photo: a Tower Records Japan Inc. store in Tokyo, Japan.
    Life

    The Bankrupt American Brands Still Thriving in Japan

    Cultural cachet, licensing deals, and density explain why Toys ‘R’ Us, Tower Records, Barneys, and other faded U.S. retailers remain big across the Pacific.

  3. photo: an Uber driver.
    Perspective

    Did Uber Just Enable Discrimination by Destination?

    In California, the ride-hailing company is changing a policy used as a safeguard against driver discrimination against low-income and minority riders.

  4. Transportation

    How Media Coverage of Car Crashes Downplays the Role of Drivers

    Safety advocates have long complained that media outlets tend to blame pedestrians and cyclists who are hit by cars. Research suggests they’re right.

  5. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

×