In the Netherlands, it's 500 meters of TRON.

In 2012, Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde and civil engineering firm Heijmans promised to install the first glow-in-the-dark road in the Netherlands by mid-2013. Now, well into 2014, the concept has finally come to life in Oss, a city about 60 miles southeast of Amsterdam.

The photo-luminizing markings, which absorb daylight then release a green glow for up to eight hours in the dark, were recently unveiled on a 500-meter stretch of highway.

This is one of several technologies Roosegaarde and Heijmans envisioned with their "Smart Highway" project, which dreamt of self-sustainable and interactive roads. Other wild ideas (like snowflake symbols that would manifest on the street surface when temperature hits a certain low) did not make it into this pilot stage.

According to the BBC, an official launch for the glow-in-the-dark road is set for later this month. DutchNews.nl reports that Roosegaarde also wants to light up additional roads, but so far hasn't negotiated any more contracts.

Watch Roosegaarde drive along the glowing lines in this video from Dutch public broadcasting network NOS. 

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