Google

From 2007 to today.

Ever wanted to time travel? As long as you're primarily interested in visiting some time between 2007 and the present, and a place that easily reachable by car, and you're in luck. As of Wednesday, Google is putting past images from its Street View service online, to be matched up with the most recent take. Since the company has visited many major routes multiple times since starting their project to collect the globe, it's now possible to see how places have changed over time. 

The feature isn't yet live for all users. But when it is, anyone using Google Maps on a browser will be able to click a clock icon in the upper lefthand corner of a street view map to scroll through the images over time. Here's Google's example of the Freedom Tower being built: 

Users will also be able to view destruction in Onagawa, Japan after the 2011 earthquake, and construction of the 2014 World Cup stadiums, for example. Google released a handful of spliced images to show some of the more interesting changes, below: 

A neighborhood in Japan in July 2008, left, and in August 2011, after a major earthquake hit, right.  (AP/Google) 
\
This image shows what the Howard Theater in Washington looked like in July 2009, left, and after renovation in May 2012, right.. AP/Google
Google 
Google

This post originally appeared on The Wire. More from our partner site:

 

About the Author

Abby Ohlheiser
Abby Ohlheiser

Abby Ohlheiser is a former staff writer for The Wire.

Most Popular

  1. Life

    When Artificial Intelligence Rules the City

    An expert panel ponders how AI will change our lives.

  2. Design

    The Military Declares War on Sprawl

    The Pentagon thinks better designed, more walkable bases can help curb obesity and improve troops’ fitness.

  3. The price of bananas is displayed on a digital price tag at a 365 by Whole Foods Market grocery store.
    How To

    The Past and Future of Urban Grocery Shopping

    In his new book, Michael Ruhlman charts the overlap of food, commerce, and identity.

  4. Modest two-bedroom apartments are unaffordable to full-time minimum wage workers in every U.S. county.
    Maps

    Rent Is Affordable to Low-Wage Workers in Exactly 12 U.S. Counties

    America’s mismatch between wages and rental prices is more perverse than ever.

  5. School district secessions are often motivated by race and income
    Equity

    School Secession Is Segregation

    As more districts splinter along lines of race and income, judicial processes meant to protect the fair distribution of educational resources are failing, a new report finds.