Going green all the way.

While typical restaurants dump eight gallons of waste per hour, it took Justin Vrany’s Chicago-based sandwich shop two years to accumulate that amount -- everything else was aggressively recycled or composted.

And even better, when an artist recently snatched up the remaining waste for a sculpture project, Sandwich Me In became a totally zero-waste establishment.

In a new short film produced by NationsSwell, Vrany walks us through how his shop stays sustainable and garbage-less. It turns out, hauling tons of trash home is a big part of it.

(h/t LaughingSquid)

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