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Paradise really doesn't come cheap. 

When we think of expensive cities, New York City and San Francisco are the usual suspects.

But according to new data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Honolulu is actually more expensive than those cities when comparing Regional Price Parities. RPPs, which measure the difference in the price level of various expenditures (including food, transportation, education, and rent) across regions of the U.S. for a particular year, are expressed as a percentage of the national price level, set at 100.

In 2012, Honolulu posted an RPP of 122.9, the highest of any metro area in the U.S. This means its prices are 22.9 percent higher there than the U.S. average. New York is not far behind, but San Francisco, with an RPPs of 121.3, actually comes in after San Jose, CA (122.0) and Bridgeport, CT (121.5).

(h/t Vox

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