Proof that mom-and-pop shops have lost out to chain-stores and condos. 

Over a decade ago, James and Karla Murray set out to photograph hundreds of mom-and-pop stores around New York City, an effort that led to the critically-acclaimed book Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York.

Now, the pair has taken their project to another level: they’ve started returning to the very storefronts they captured 10 years ago and shooting what's there now. The result is a growing series of powerful before-and-afters that illustrate how the city's streetscape has evolved, mostly in the direction of chain-stores, condos, and banks.

In this new series, the photographers aim to highlight the unique character and historical value of neighborhood shops. “We also hope that viewers will frequent small businesses so that they will continue to survive for many more years,” they wrote in an email to the Huffington Post.

Here’s a selection. See the rest here

2nd Ave Deli - 2nd Avenue at East 10th Street in East Village
Mars Bar, corner of 2nd Ave. and E 1st St. in East Village

 

Eighth Avenue at West 46th Street 
West Houston Street near Varick Street Greenwich Village
The Bowery
Union Square
Harlem
Lower East Side

All images via James and Karla Photography on Facebook.

(h/t Fast Company)  

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    Is This Red, White, and Blue Elephant Worth Saving?

    Illinois politicians agree that Chicago’s Thompson Center should be replaced. Architects and preservationists beg to differ, and a new documentary presents their case.

  2. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  3. Maps

    Mapping Where Europe's Population Is Moving, Aging, and Finding Work

    Younger people are fleeing rural areas, migrating northward, and having fewer children. Here’s how that’s changing the region.

  4. A toxic site in Niagara Falls, New York, seen from above.
    Environment

    The Toxic 'Blank Spots' of Niagara Falls

    The region’s “chemical genies” of the early 20th century were heralded as reaching into the future to create a more abundant life for all. Instead, they deprived future generations of their health and well-being.

  5. Life

    Venice Mayor to Tourists: Stop Whining and Pay Up

    British visitors were overcharged for lunch, the U.K. press pounced, and now everyone is mad.