Proof that mom-and-pop shops have lost out to chain-stores and condos. 

Over a decade ago, James and Karla Murray set out to photograph hundreds of mom-and-pop stores around New York City, an effort that led to the critically-acclaimed book Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York.

Now, the pair has taken their project to another level: they’ve started returning to the very storefronts they captured 10 years ago and shooting what's there now. The result is a growing series of powerful before-and-afters that illustrate how the city's streetscape has evolved, mostly in the direction of chain-stores, condos, and banks.

In this new series, the photographers aim to highlight the unique character and historical value of neighborhood shops. “We also hope that viewers will frequent small businesses so that they will continue to survive for many more years,” they wrote in an email to the Huffington Post.

Here’s a selection. See the rest here

2nd Ave Deli - 2nd Avenue at East 10th Street in East Village
Mars Bar, corner of 2nd Ave. and E 1st St. in East Village

 

Eighth Avenue at West 46th Street 
West Houston Street near Varick Street Greenwich Village
The Bowery
Union Square
Harlem
Lower East Side

All images via James and Karla Photography on Facebook.

(h/t Fast Company)  

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