It's like Mario if the power-ups were crack pipes and the Goombas were cops and reporters.

Never thought I'd say this, but Rob Ford deserves better. With the amount of public-relations napalm he's dropped Toronto, the embattled mayor should've gotten a slick first-person shooter with a graphics engine blasting shock and awe – or at least a Dance Dance Revolution clone – not this heh-heh bare-bones riff on a side-scrolling video game.

"Rob Ford: The Game" drops an orb-shaped mayor into a world where the walls are Canadian flags and the enemies are cops and journalists. Power-ups come in the form of marijuana leaves, crack pipes, and bottles of booze, and throughout the level are sound bites taken from Ford's own mouth (including a vulgar one about cunnilingus).

The objective far as I can tell is to maximize your "Party Score" by gobbling up all the illicit substances before a timer labeled "Public Opinion" runs out. When it does, a screen pops up showing a shame-faced Ford and the depressing real-life factoid: "You've been impeached! (actually Canadian mayors can't be impeached)."

The game has attracted a rush of players despite its rudimentary design, according to Nick Mostowich, who created it with his roommate. "Just under 52,000 games have been played today alone," he tweeted yesterday. "I'm humbled. Thank you all so much." Mostowich also wants you to know that "this is fun legal satire, not a defamation campaign," and if you're having trouble playing, that the "crack has been updated to actual crack."

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