Reuters

What to do if you're in a rush.

Next time you’re riding in a New York City taxicab, try this hack: Even before reaching your destination, you can tap the fare on the television screen and swipe your credit card ahead of time. No need to conduct the transaction if you’re in a rush at the end of the ride.

It’s not quite Uber-level convenience, but it will save a little time and make you feel like a champion New Yorker. The feature, for some odd reason, is completely hidden. Here’s how it works.

1. At any point in the ride, tap the fare on screen

Tap Fare

Try to ignore the food on the cab's floor.

2. Swipe your credit card

Swipe

It doesn't say you can swipe your card, but you can.

3. Select a percentage tip

Tip

You can enter an amount instead of a percentage, if you must.

4. Say if you want a receipt

Receipt

5. Sit back, and enjoy the rest of your ride

Done

You can cancel the swipe before you arrive at your destination. At the end of the ride, you'll simply be asked to confirm the fare and process the transaction.

Hat tip to Jon Steinbeck for revealing this magic.


This post originally appeared on Quartz. More from our partner site:

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