Reuters

What to do if you're in a rush.

Next time you’re riding in a New York City taxicab, try this hack: Even before reaching your destination, you can tap the fare on the television screen and swipe your credit card ahead of time. No need to conduct the transaction if you’re in a rush at the end of the ride.

It’s not quite Uber-level convenience, but it will save a little time and make you feel like a champion New Yorker. The feature, for some odd reason, is completely hidden. Here’s how it works.

1. At any point in the ride, tap the fare on screen

Tap Fare

Try to ignore the food on the cab's floor.

2. Swipe your credit card

Swipe

It doesn't say you can swipe your card, but you can.

3. Select a percentage tip

Tip

You can enter an amount instead of a percentage, if you must.

4. Say if you want a receipt

Receipt

5. Sit back, and enjoy the rest of your ride

Done

You can cancel the swipe before you arrive at your destination. At the end of the ride, you'll simply be asked to confirm the fare and process the transaction.

Hat tip to Jon Steinbeck for revealing this magic.


This post originally appeared on Quartz. More from our partner site:

About the Author

Zachary M. Seward
Zachary M. Seward

Zachary M. Seward is a senior editor at Quartz. He previously worked at The Wall Street Journal and Harvard's Nieman Journalism Lab. He teaches digital journalism at NYU.

Most Popular

  1. Postcards showing the Woodner when it used to be a luxury apartment-hotel in the '50s and '60s, from the collection of John DeFerrari
    Equity

    The Neighborhood Inside a Building

    D.C.’s massive Woodner apartment building has lived many lives—from fancy hotel to one of the last bastions of affordable housing in a gentrifying neighborhood. Now, it’s on the brink of another change.

  2. Design

    The Military Declares War on Sprawl

    The Pentagon thinks better designed, more walkable bases can help curb obesity and improve troops’ fitness.

  3. Members of a tenants' organization in East Harlem gather outside the office of landlord developer Dawnay, Day Group, as lawyers attempt to serve the company with court papers on behalf of tenants, during a press conference in New York. The tenant's group, Movement for Justice in El Barrio, filed suit against Dawnay, Day Group, the London-based investment corporation "for harassing tenants by falsely and illegally charging fees in attempts to push immigrant families from their homes and gentrify the neighborhood," said Chaumtoli Huq, an attorney for the tenants.
    Equity

    Toward Being a Better Gentrifier

    There’s a right way and a wrong way to be a neighbor during a time of rapid community change.

  4. Equity

    The Poverty Just Over the Hills From Silicon Valley

    The South Coast, a 30-mile drive from Palo Alto, is facing an affordable-housing shortage that is jeopardizing its agricultural heritage.

  5. Equity

    The Hoarding of the American Dream

    A new book examines how the upper-middle class has enriched itself and harmed economic mobility.