But there's no "srirachapocalypse" just yet.

In the latest installment of the hot sauce apocalypse saga, officials in California have declared the production of Sriracha hot chili sauce a public nuisance and are threatening to shut it down forever. The announcement was a long time coming — back in October, residents of Irwindale, the California town where sriracha is produced. were complaining of irritated eyes, headaches and sore throats, due to emissions from the factory. In November, the city council ordered the Huy Fong Foods plant, the company that makes the iconic sauce, to shut down. 

After a unanimous vote on Wednesday, Irwindale’s city council have issued an ultimatum to Huy Fong: reduce the wafting smell of the beloved spicy condiment, or someone else will do it, reports Rory Carroll at the Guardian. Huy Fong's attorney, John Tate told the hearing that lingering smell will be under control by June and the company will have an "action plan" ready in 10 days.

Reigning in the smell is especially time-sensitive: chili grinding season, the time of year that creates the strongest smells, starts in August, reports Sarah Favot at the Pasadena Star-News. Right now there is no immediate risk of shutdown, but the company is clearly feeling the heat, so to speak. Time is running out, but there’s no "srirachapocalypse" just yet.

This post originally appeared on The Wire, an Atlantic partner site.

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