Boxbee

Boxbee bills itself as an "urban storage valet."

Have some extra stuff you just can’t throw away? In San Francisco and New York, there's a new storage option that lets you pay for only the space you need. Boxbee lets you order one or more standard-size boxes, which then get delivered to your home for free. Once you get started on packing away those off-season clothes or old books, add the items to Boxbee’s online inventory system. That way, you’ll know exactly which box to retrieve later. You can even designate boxes to be shared with friends or colleagues.

Storage for one Boxbee box: $6/mo. in San Francisco, $7.50/mo. in New York City. Pickups are always free. Each retrieval delivery costs $15 plus $2 per box.

 

Catalog your items for easy retrieval (screenshot via Youtube

This video explains the process in more detail. 

 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A sign outside a storefront in Buffalo, New York.
    Environment

    Will Buffalo Become a Climate Change Haven?

    The Western New York city possesses a distinct mix of weather, geography, and infrastructure that could make it a potential climate haven. But for whom?

  2. photo: a high-speed train in Switzerland
    Transportation

    The Case for Portland-to-Vancouver High-Speed Rail

    At the Cascadia Rail Summit outside Seattle, a fledgling scheme to bring high-speed rail from Portland to Vancouver found an enthusiastic reception.

  3. photo: a woman on an electric scooter
    Transportation

    Why Aren’t More Women Riding Electric Scooters?

    Most users of micromobility devices like dockless scooters and e-bikes are young men. Fixing that gender gap may take more than just adding safety features.

  4. A Charles Booth map of streets north of London's Hyde Park.
    Maps

    19th-Century London’s Extreme Wealth and Poverty, Mapped

    Charles Booth’s famous maps of Victorian London offer a chance to reflect on how the city has changed—and how it hasn’t.

  5. Life

    Americans Work More Than Ever, and More Than Anyone Else

    Thanks to the internet, every hour is a potential working hour.

×