Boxbee

Boxbee bills itself as an "urban storage valet."

Have some extra stuff you just can’t throw away? In San Francisco and New York, there's a new storage option that lets you pay for only the space you need. Boxbee lets you order one or more standard-size boxes, which then get delivered to your home for free. Once you get started on packing away those off-season clothes or old books, add the items to Boxbee’s online inventory system. That way, you’ll know exactly which box to retrieve later. You can even designate boxes to be shared with friends or colleagues.

Storage for one Boxbee box: $6/mo. in San Francisco, $7.50/mo. in New York City. Pickups are always free. Each retrieval delivery costs $15 plus $2 per box.

 

Catalog your items for easy retrieval (screenshot via Youtube

This video explains the process in more detail. 

 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. An illustration of a private train.
    Transportation

    Let’s Buy a Train

    If you dream of roaming the U.S. in a your own personal train car, you still can. But Amtrak cuts have railcar owners wondering if their days are numbered.

  2. A photo of the interior of a WeWork co-working office.
    Design

    WeWork Wants to Build the ‘Future of Cities.’ What Does That Mean?

    The co-working startup is hatching plans to deploy data to reimagine urban problems. In the past, it has profiled neighborhoods based on class indicators.

  3. Transportation

    China's 50-Lane Traffic Jam Is Every Commuter's Worst Nightmare

    What happens when a checkpoint merges 50 lanes down to 20.

  4. Equity

    How Poor Americans Get Exploited by Their Landlords

    American landlords derive more profit from renters in low-income neighborhoods, researchers Matthew Desmond and Nathan Wilmers find.

  5. In this image from "No Small Plans," a character makes his way to the intersection of State and Madison Streets in 1928 Chicago.
    Stuff

    Drawing Up an Urban Planning Manual for Chicago Teens

    The graphic novel No Small Plans aims to empower the city’s youth through stories about their neighborhoods.