Suck UK

"Stay dry and get noticed."

During the day, this standard and sturdy gray umbrella may help you stand out just a bit from the sea of rainy-day black. But at night, the luminous glow of Suck UK's hi-reflective umbrella lets you walk around confidently and visibly, a noticeable beacon on the dark city streets. Designed by Yee-Ling Wan, the umbrella is covered in a special material that reflects back the glow of street lights and car headlights to make sure drivers can spot you easily. At $35, it's definitely pricier than what you'd find at the drug store, but that may be a small price to pay for a dry night, a safe walk, and a little peace of mind.

Hi-Reflective Umbrella, $35 at Suck UK

 

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