Kikkerland

And a portion of the proceeds go to help the homeless.

Those quintessentially New York Greek deli coffee cups are no strangers to holding loose change. In his walks through the Bowery, designer George Skelcher saw panhandlers using these ubiquitous hot beverage containers and knew he wanted to help. Skelcher's Lucky Beggar Wallet is designed to look like the blue-and-white cups, complete with the motto "We Are Happy to Serve You" emblazoned on the side.

The wallet looks like a slightly crumpled cup, and a zipper across the lid lets you safely carry change for easy access, should you want to give any away. Even better, a portion of the proceeds go to HELP USA, a New York-based organization that has worked with the homeless since 1986.

Lucky Beggar Wallet, $20, Kikkerland.com.

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