MIT Media Lab

And you can control it all with voice and gesture commands.

What if you only had to buy one piece of furniture to make your tiny apartment abundantly livable?

CityHome, a new project from MIT Media Lab’s Changing Places group, promises to make that fantasy a reality. The highly transformable device, loaded with built-in sensors, motors, and LED lights, promises to make a 200 sq.ft. apartment feel three times larger.

What is it, exactly? Essentially a bed, office desk, dining table, kitchen counter, stove top, and storage space, all tucked into a closet-sized module. Here’s the fun part —whatever you need, just ask, literally. CityHome is controllable by voice, touch, and gestures. The device itself can even slide over a few feet to alter the dimensions of the spaces—you might toggle between a bigger bedroom or a bigger bathroom, for example. 

In terms of how much CityHome might cost for the average consumer, lead researcher Kent Larson won’t give any concrete numbers. He argues that if it’s mass-produced, the technology will certainly be affordable—especially when compared to the cost of sustaining larger apartments. Larson is already talking with manufacturers about bringing CityHome to market.

In this demo, watch how CityHome can accommodate dinner gatherings, shower time, and impromptu dance parties.

 

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