Henty

Part suit bag, part messenger bag.

Bicycle commuters love comparing notes on how they deal with the logistical challenges of making it from their sweaty rides to their business-casual cubicles. Tasmanian company Henty's Wingman pack may just put those debates to rest.

All rolled up, the Wingman looks like a simple and streamlined cylindrical pack with a padded shoulder strap. But taking it apart reveals a savvy system for getting your suit, shoes, and other work gear to the office clean and free of wrinkles. The hanging suit bag, designed to hold one suit and shirt, uses semi-rigid plastic ribbing to keep your work clothes from getting creased. It rolls around a gym bag that can hold shoes, toiletries, and other bike-to-office must-haves. On the outside, there's a padded sleeve that fits tablets and laptops up to 13 inches. The bag comes in two sizes, depending on your shoulder width, and even comes with a rain cover to keep your things dry during your wettest commutes. 

Check out the system in action below:

The Wingman, AUD$199 ($184 U.S.) from Henty. Free shipping within Australia only. Comes with a one-year warranty.

 

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