Tablio

For those who need to work on the go. 

Using your laptop as its name would suggest—resting on your lap—is a quick recipe for overheating. Lap desks are a more comfortable solution, but they're often totally impractical for a worker on the move. That's why California-based designer Rodolfo Lozano created the Tablio, a sleek lap-desk with vents to let your laptop cool off and keep your legs from absorbing the heat. The bamboo desk, which weighs in at about two pounds, is about the same size as a 15-inch laptop, and so can store easily in your laptop bag or backpack.

Vents are available on either just the top or on both sides, and in both models two side-panels slide out to provide platforms for a mouse and to keep a phone handy. With the Tablio in hand, you'll have a surface to comfortably get work done in parks, crowded cafes, even while in transit. Though it won't be out until August, you can preorder now online. 

Find out more in the video below:

Tablio Mini Desk, $97, pre-order via rl-dh.com.

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