eCool

Denmark's eCool stores two-dozen cans four feet underground. 

Here’s one way to make sure you never run out of cold beerkeep a stash in your backyard with an "earth cooler." Invented by four clever guys from Denmark, the eCool plugs into the consistently cool temperatures underground, rather than electricity. The device, which lets you store and retrieve beer via a hand crank and vertical conveyor system, measures almost four feet in height and can hold up to 24 cans. Installation is straightforward — use a garden drill, or even a shovel will do.

According to the creators of eCool, local climate will factor in to the actual temperature of beverages stored in the device. They recommend burying a can and checking if you’re satisfied with how cold it gets before making a purchase.  

$349 at eCool.

Photos courtesy of eCool 

This animation demos how the eCool works. 

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