Reuters/Sergio Moraes

It takes 15 seconds, and you'll never miss a game you want to see.

The World Cup is upon us. There are so many games during the group play portion of the global tournament that it's hard to keep up with them all. 

So, some good soccer samaritans on Reddit have created calendars that you can easily import into your own scheduling apparatus. 

There are good options whether you use Google Calendar or something like Apple's Calendar app: 

  1. If you use Google, go to this site, then hit the little button in the lower right hand corner. It should show up on your calendar, but you can toggle it on and off in the left pane of Google Calendar.
  2. If you use the Calendar app, download this .ics file, then click on it. It'll bring up a dialog box asking where you want to put all the events. You probably want to add the games to their own new calendar.

Now, it should be noted that this is not a World Cup specific thing. Many teams do this for their fans. Here are instructions for the New York Yankees. And here are all the NFL teams, including your Oakland Raiders. 

Bottom line: if you love a team/league/sport, you will be able to find calendar data that you can easily import. 

Now let's go Ivory Coast! 

Via Jacob Wolman, who is not a Yankees fan.

 

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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