Food Huggers

Food Huggers promise “less waste, more taste."

Move over ill-fitting Tupperware and Ziploc bags, leftover fruits and veggies have found their perfect “other half.” Food Huggers are silicone disks that mold snugly around halved fruits and veggies, sealing in scents and keeping your food fresher for longer. They come in four different sizes, so they’ll fit anything from onions and tomatoes to limes and cucumbers. The material is BPA-free and safe to use in microwaves, dishwashers, and freezers. The Food Huggers online shop offers a variety of multi-packs—there’s a set of only small-size pieces, a set that has all four sizes, and one with just two avocado savers.  

Food Huggers sets, $9.99-$14.99 at Food Huggers

All images courtesy of Food Huggers.

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