Customers will be able to book a chopper ride over Mumbai through Uber. Reuters

You'll get brunch, too.

While the cab-hailing app Uber is in the news elsewhere as traditional taxi drivers rise in protest in European capitals, the company, recently valued at $17 billion, looks set to enjoy a weekend of buzz around the brand in India.

In Mumbai and Bangalore, Uber is offering a one-time service this weekend–users can “hail” a chopper. Effectively, they can book a chopper ride from within the app. For Rs5,000 ($85) for two people, an Uber cab will pick you up and take you to a helipad, from where a chopper service operated by a commercial operator will take you on a 20- to 30-minute ride around the city. This will be followed by brunch and a ride back home.

In the US, Uber offered a similar service last summer offering five seats for $3,000.

“We try and look at ways to democratize premium experiences. We will see how the service goes on Father’s Day weekend and then decide on whether we can offer the service more regularly and in other parts of the country,” says Bhavik Rathod, Uber general manager in Bangalore.

Less than 5% of India’s 600,000 taxis are in the organized segment. So investors see major potential. Venture capital firms have invested more than $130 million in the last seven years in radio cab companies and in booking platforms. Uber, which entered India last year, enjoys a reputation among the young and savvy in India’s big cities for the premium vehicles–Honda Civil, Toyota Corolla, Mercedes Benz S-class and Audi A6, among others–it sends its customers.

For this weekend, the initiative is more a brand awareness exercise than anything else, and the company is hoping to attract peak interest. “We are expecting a huge demand for the service, but the number of people we can accommodate will depend on weather conditions and aviation rules about the time till which we can fly,” Rathod said.

Deals on Groupon offer a chopper ride over Mumbai by Air Deccan, the same service provider Uber is using, starting at Rs3499.

This post originally appeared on Quartz, an Atlantic partner site.

MORE FROM QUARTZ:

The Story of Internet Investing In One Chart

The Most Important 13 Charts From a Crucial Week For the Global Economy

The 747 Is Going Extinct

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a full parking lot with a double rainbow over it
    Transportation

    Parking Reform Will Save the City

    Cities that require builders to provide off-street parking trigger more traffic, sprawl, and housing unaffordability. But we can break the vicious cycle.   

  2. A woman looks straight at camera with others people and trees in background.
    Equity

    Why Pittsburgh Is the Worst City for Black Women, in 6 Charts

    Pittsburgh is the worst place for black women to live in for just about every indicator of livability, says the city’s Gender Equity Commission.

  3. Transportation

    Why Are Little Kids in Japan So Independent?

    In Japan, small children take the subway and run errands alone, no parent in sight. The reason why has more to do with social trust than self-reliance.

  4. Life

    Mapping the Changing Colors of Fall Across the U.S.

    Much of the country won’t see those vibrant oranges and reds until mid-October, which leaves plenty of time for leaf peepers to plan their autumn road trips.

  5. a map comparing the sizes of several cities
    Maps

    The Commuting Principle That Shaped Urban History

    From ancient Rome to modern Atlanta, the shape of cities has been defined by the technologies that allow commuters to get to work in about 30 minutes.

×