The view of New York from the International Space Station, in scarf form. Slow Factory

Wearable satellite images of Paris, London, and New York. 

There's something oddly soothing about satellite photos of Earth, especially ones shot at night. Now that feeling is wearable, with Slow Factory's gorgeous new silk scarves. Printed with images of world cities captured aboard the International Space Station, the scarves measure an immense 52 inches in length—which helps the familiar patterns of Paris, London, and New York pop in vivid detail. There's one with the U.S.A., too. At $295 apiece, these accessories are surely pricey, but don't fear: the photographs are open-source. So if the price tag is pushing it, you can always screen-print your own.

Cities by Night scarves, $295 at Slow Factory.

Paris
London
USA

All images courtesy of Slow Factory

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