Parco City

Please note that these nigiri-themed suitcases are not edible.

Want to fly in style while at the same time having hungry, deliriously sleep-deprived travelers gnawing at your luggage? Then grab hold of these toothsome totes, which are designed to look like shrimp, tuna, and other pieces of nigiri sushi.

The "Traveling Sushi Bag Covers" are skins that slip over your suitcase to transform it into a seemingly gargantuan block of raw fish and rice. Available for about $30 online, the items are made from 100 percent polyester that, according to Google Translate, "supports a little water and dust. I will protect your trunk!" They come in four styles: The aforementioned shrimp and tuna, plus salmon and the deliciously sweet omelet tamago.

Appropriately, it was the Japanese culture blog Spoon and Tamago that helped unearth this bizarre item from the bowels of the Internet. Writes blogger Johnny, a dreamer at heart:

An extra bonus of the nylon sushi covers: If enough people start using them, the baggage claim area at airports will turn into one gigantic kaiten-zushi, the conveyor belt sushi shops where people pick and choose the sushi as it moves by in front of them. Now wouldn’t that be a sight!

Just in case you're unclear, the vendor of these curious items notes that the "suitcase is not edible."

Parco City

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