A visual history of the "rooster sauce" that goes with everything.

Ever wonder where Sriracha got its name? Decades before the wildly popular "rooster sauce" hit America, it was invented by a Thai woman named Thanom Chakkapak in the seaside town of Si Racha. In this excerpt from the documentary Sriracha, filmmaker Griffin Hammond and food writer Randy Clemens trace the history of the sauce to its original source—and learn that it doesn't taste quite the way they expected.
 
"The Thai version is quite a bit different," Clemens says. "It's not quite as hot, it's thinner in consistency, and it's a little bit sweeter."

 
If you'd like to watch the rest of Sriracha, the full documentary is available for download on Vimeo.

Courtesy of Griffin Hammond.

This video originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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