A 2D taxi can be flipped 360 degrees. Natasha Kholgade/Carnegie Mellon University

Computer engineers have created software that could make it impossible to tell if photos are real. 

A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University and UC Berkeley have invented a new type of editing software that allows 3D editing of 2D photos. And it's pretty amazing.

Using publicly available 3D images from the internet as a proxy, the software creates highly accurate replications of a 2D-photographed object's hidden area. This gives a photo editor the ability to manipulate the full physical range of their subject.

"Instead of simply editing 'what we see' in the photograph, our goal is to manipulate 'what we know' about the scene behind the photograph,” the team of computer engineers write in their study. On August 13, the 3D photo editing system will be showcased at the SIGGRAPH 2014 Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques in Vancouver.

You have to watch the video to really appreciate what they've done here:

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo shows the Amazon logo on a building.
    Amazon HQ2

    Amazon’s HQ2 Spectacle Isn’t Just Shameful—It Should Be Illegal

    Each year, local governments spend nearly $100 billion to move headquarters and factories between states. It’s a wasteful exercise that requires a national solution.

  2. A photo of a small small house in San Francisco's Noe Valley that sold for $1.8 million in 2014.
    Equity

    Single-Family Zoning: The Biggest Battle in the Generational Housing War

    As cities wake up to their housing crises, the problems with single-family-home residential zoning will become too egregious to ignore.

  3. A man walks his dog on a hilltop overlooking San Francisco in the early morning hours on Mount Davidson.
    Equity

    When Millennials Battle Boomers Over Housing

    In Generation Priced Out, Randy Shaw examines how Boomers have blocked affordable housing in urban neighborhoods, leaving Millennial homebuyers in the lurch.

  4. Cyclists and walks use a trail beside Lady Bird Lake in Austin, Texas.
    Life

    HQ2 Is Only Part of the Story of Big-Tech Expansion

    Amazon HQ2 may be split between superstar cities, but San Francisco’s big tech firms are starting to expand into smaller, non-coastal places.

  5. A photo of a resident of Community First Village, a tiny-home community for people who were once living in homelessness, outside of Austin, Texas.!
    Design

    Austin's Fix for Homelessness: Tiny Houses, and Lots of Neighbors

    Community First! Village’s model for ending homelessness emphasizes the stabilizing power of social connections.