Bloom Theory

It's time to give the modest camera strap some love. 

For the avid photographer, camera equipment is a serious concern. Expensive lenses must be protected at all costs. High-ticket, high-tech bags cushion your precious gear, and UV filters abound to ensure that perfect lighting can be captured. But sorely overlooked in the realm of photography apparel is the camera strap—that crusty, smelly, fraying string that has weathered your sweatiest hikes and saltiest boating expeditions while keeping your camera safe with the simplest technology possible. It's time to give the modest camera strap a little love.

That’s why the “Bloom” strap could be a great addition to your on-the-go photography kit. It’s a 2-in-1 combo—a stylish scarf and a reliable camera strap. While traditional straps inevitably dig into your neck, the Bloom strap is soft and molds to your body. And it solves a style issue (for wedding photographers, especially): With one of these, your camera strap becomes part of  your formal attire. Sure, you might draw a few looks from the scraggly, in-the-trenches, film-only crowd. But a strap is a strap—this one just has a little more flair. 

Bloom camera straps, $50-$130 at Bloom Theory.

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