Liberty Bottleworks

A source of urban pride you can carry around.

“The [Boston] T is so much better than the [D.C.] Metro,” my best friend always argues.

“The T is slow and dirty,” I counter. “At least the Metro has benches at every station to sit on.”

We’re all guilty of engaging in one of these petty, drawn out arguments from time to time. The triumph of one city over the other can boil down to a range of things: sports teams, the number of Michelin rated restaurants, the ability to recover from a bad snow storm. But when it comes to debates about public transportation networks, how best to bring a little substance to your next rant about City X?

Liberty Bottleworks is selling BPA-free water bottles that boast the mass transit maps of 11 U.S. cities. Carry around New Orleans’ simple streetcar system, or take NYC’s sprawling subway map with you to the gym. But most importantly, have the bottle with you next time someone tries to take a shot at your city’s transit system, and you’ll be able to back yourself up with an actual map.

Mass Transit Water Bottle, $23.00 for 24 oz., $25.00 for 32 oz. at Liberty Bottles

 Let the debate begin.
(Liberty Bottleworks)

 

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