CroMary/Shutterstock.com

Car manufacturers' efforts have been fruitless, so entrepreneurs are developing ways to save children's lives.

It's a fatal lapse of memory: The parent leaves the car, locks the door, and takes off, child still in the backseat, with the windows rolled up and the temperature rising.

Automakers once touted technology to solve the problem: General Motors promised radar sensors that would sound an alarm in 2001. Ford promised new camera technology that would tangentially prevent heatstroke prevention, reported NBC News last month.

But in an illuminating piece Wednesday, The Washington Post traced the development of such technology. While GM, Ford, and Chrysler have no product plans lined up for the near future, many parents and young entrepreneurs have taken the matter into their own hands.

The report follows a summer that has seen the deaths of a 22-month-old after his father left the boy alone in a hot car for seven hours, a 15-month-old boy in Connecticut who was left in a vehicle on a day when the temperature reached 88 degrees, and a 10-month-old girl in Kansas who was found unresponsive in a car parked outside her foster parents' house

Rebecca Robbins of The Washington Post outlined the options:

  1. The Aneiros Child Car Seat Safety System
    What It Does: Alerts parents and can activate air conditioning inside the car. Here's the crowdfunding campaign.
     
  2. Hot Seat
    What It Does: It sounds alarms through a pressure sensor pad that's linked to a parent's key fob. The crowdfunding campaign has raised more than $20,000.
     
  3. Starfish
    What It Does: Also a sensor, but it's weight-activated and sends parents a smartphone alert if they walk too far away from their car. Its in the middle of its Kickstarter campaign.
     
  4. Precious Cargo
    How It Works: It's an app that connects with a car's Bluetooth device to set off an alarm for parents when they turn off the car. 
     
  5. Remember the Kids
    How It Works: An algorithm tracks the parent's movements, and then the app sends an alert asks "Did you Remember the Kids?" when the parent stops moving for three minutes or longer.
     
  6. E-Z Baby Saver
    How It Works: This one's not as hi-tech as the others. It uses a chain of rubber bands to force parents to pause while exiting the car and indirectly reminds them to look in the back seat. 

(Top image via CroMary/Shutterstock.com.)

This post originally appeared on The Wire, an Atlantic partner site.

More from The Wire:

Military Jet Crashes in Virginia

'Birdman' Debuts at Venice to Soaring Accolades

French Court Investigates IMF Chief Christine Lagarde 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    A History of the American Public Library

    A visual exploration of how a critical piece of social infrastructure came to be.

  2. Equity

    Berlin Builds an Arsenal of Ideas to Stage a Housing Revolution

    The proposals might seem radical—from banning huge corporate landlords to freezing rents for five years—but polls show the public is ready for something dramatic.

  3. a map of the Mayan Train route in Mexico
    Environment

    Mexico’s ‘Mayan Train’ Is Bound for Controversy

    President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s signature rail project would link cities and tourist sites in the Yucatan with rural areas and rainforests.

  4. A photo of a design maquette for the Obama Presidential Center planned for Jackson Park and designed by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects with Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates.
    Design

    Why the Case Against the Obama Presidential Center Is So Important

    A judge has ruled that a lawsuit brought by Chicago preservationists can proceed, dealing a blow to Barack Obama's plans to build his library in Jackson Park.

  5. A sanitation employee helps homeless people with their possessions in New Orleans in October 2017.
    Equity

    Because of Louisiana, the Minimum Wage in New Orleans Is a Poverty Wage

    Around the World Day of Social Justice, we should consider why cities pay poverty wages, and why 28 states can preempt local efforts to raise the minimum wage.