Flash Invaders/iTunes

To thoroughly win, you'll need to actually go visit every continent. 

Ready to play the most difficult video game possibly ever conceived? Then pack a duffel and buy plane tickets to all these places:

(Invader)

These are the far-flung locations of street art installed by Invader, a French dude obsessed with plastering the world with classic video-game mosaics. They're also the destinations you must visit to win his new gaming app, "Flash Invaders," which challenges fans to compete against one another in photographing his outdoor body of work.

The project has a strong whiff of self-promotion, but given the joys of exploration it offers globe-trotting art enthusiasts, it's excusable. Here's how it works: Spot an Invader artwork and snap it with your phone's camera. The app employs image-recognition software to identify the piece and score you points, which you can lord over your buddies on social media. And according to RJ Rushmore at Vandalog, who's tested it, there's also a built-in GPS-verification system to establish you were actually there (and not just uploading results from Google Images).

The game has attracted nearly 600 users who've accumulated more than 10,000 photos of these 8-bit tributes. Here are some of the latest points awarded around the planet:

(Invader)

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